Tiger Woods has so much still to offer amid Saudi chaos that retirement is not an option

When The Open Championship heads to St Andrews a special week of golf is always on the cards, but this year’s event has more meaning than ever. The fourth major championship of the campaign heads to the famous Old Course in what will be the 150th anniversary golf’s oldest competition.

The landmark event will also see one of the greatest to master the historic Scottish circuit in three-time Claret Jug winner Tiger Woods, as he returns to compete. Woods will take to the Old Course just 17 months after suffering life-changing injuries in a severe car crash in Los Angeles.

In typical Tiger fashion he has battled his way back, and after appearing at this year’s Masters and PGA Championship, the American will make his most eagerly awaited comeback appearance yet at a course that means so much to him.

St Andrews is the place in which Woods has won two of his three Open titles back in 2000 and 2005, and a course he has described as his ‘favourite in the world’. The milestone event and Woods’ affinity to St Andrews has led many to tip this week’s tournament as the perfect way for the American to bow out from his truly remarkable golf career.

It has been no secret that Woods has struggled on the course since the accident, and that is of course to be expected. Back in November when the 82-time PGA Tour winner revealed the horrific details of the crash, he admitted that amputation of his leg was ‘on the cards’, so it is no surprise to see him limp his way around the course.






Tiger Woods returned to the PGA Tour at the Masters in April


Tiger Woods returned to the PGA Tour at the Masters in April
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Getty Images)

Despite completing four gruelling rounds at Augusta in April, fears began to grow surrounding Woods’ future following his withdrawal from the PGA Championship a month later. After completing three rounds, a struggling Tiger called time on his week, leading many to believe his return to St Andrews could be his fairytale end.

But with Woods still only 46-years-old, already confirming his switch to a part-time schedule, owning a life-time PGA Tour membership, and possessing the talent he does, why would he call time on his stellar career so early? As well on the course, Woods’ impact off it is also just as important, especially with the sport gripped in a civil war following the emergence of the LIV Golf Series.

Woods – alongside the likes of Rory McIlroy and Justin Thomas – has acted as golf’s moral compass in squashing the idea that has plagued the game with controversy. And with the Saudi chaos seemingly not slowing down any time soon, the 15-time major champion’s power and influence within the sport’s politics is now more important than ever.

Can Tiger Woods win this year’s Open? Let us know your thoughts in the c omments section below.






Tiger Woods is nowhere near done despite retirement fears


Tiger Woods is nowhere near done despite retirement fears
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R&A via Getty Images)

Retirement in the world of golf has always proven different to other sports. The flexibility to play on the tour almost when and where – especially as past winners – means players can come and go as they please. Take Scottish stalwart Sandy Lyle for example, the 1988 Masters champion has been returning to Augusta ever since his triumph and appeared at this year’s edition aged 64. Of course, these golfing greats and past champions that have continued to turn out in their senior years have not been through the fitness problems Woods has after his LA accident.

But there is no golfer like Tiger. Time and time again the American has battled against the tide to get to where he is today. In the space of just 14 months, Woods went from lying in a hospital bed with the potential of losing his leg, to being out competing alongside the world’s best on one of the most gruelling tracks in the world in Augusta.

The idea that the 15-time major champion would go through a gruelling rehabilitation routine and arguably the hardest year of his life to call it quits after just three tournaments just isn’t the Tiger Woods way. Whilst a St Andrews swan song would prove a fitting end to his momentous career due to the fitting memories, there is no doubt the golfing great will be vowing to create more before finally calling it quits.

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